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20 Years Anniversary Exhibition

Part 2

June 26August 7, 2021

Gallery I & II

This image illustrates a link to the exhibition titled 20 Years Anniversary Exhibition Part 2

About

Vielmetter Los Angeles is pleased to present a second iteration of the gallery’s 20th anniversary exhibition on view from June 26th through August 7th, 2021. As Los Angeles re-opens, we are thrilled to continue celebrating this important milestone with our artists, clients, staff, and guests.
 
The gallery’s program was built with the belief that contemporary art has relevance for all audiences. For this reason, equity of representation has always been a guiding principle in our program. It is with great gratitude that we look back on a richly faceted exhibition history resulting from this approach.

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In this exhibition, we are honored to present new and historical works by Nick Aguayo, Edgar Arceneaux, Sadie Benning, Ellen Berkenblit, Andrea Bowers, Kim Dingle, Sean Duffy, Nicole Eisenman, Louise Fishman, Charles Gaines, Karl Haendel, Samuel Levi Jones, My Barbarian, Hugo McCloud, Dave McKenzie, Rodney McMillian. Yunhee Min, Mary Reid Kelley, Elizabeth Neel, Ruben Ochoa, Paul Mpagi Sepuya and Nicola Tyson.

Nick Aguayo
“pizzicato,” 2019
Acrylic and marble dust on canvas
86" x 86" x 2" [HxWxD] (218.44 x 218.44 x 5.08 cm)
Inventory #AGU192
Courtesy of the artist and Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photo credit: Robert Wedemeyer
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Nick Aguayo’s painting comes from his most recent body of works presented at the gallery. Rooted in the process of collage the thick impasto surfaces and textural areas of built-up and removed paint reveal layers of compositions that are both highly orchestrated and intuitively improvised.

Edgar Arceneaux
“Migrant's Totem I,” 2017
Dry erase pen on muslin
79" x 35" [HxW] (200.66 x 88.9 cm)
Inventory #ARC566
Courtesy of the artist and Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photo credit: Jeff McLane
arc566_hires-2.jpg
Edgar Arceneaux
“Migrant's Totem II,” 2017
Dry erase pen on muslin
69" x 35" [HxW] (175.26 x 88.9 cm)
Inventory #ARC568
Courtesy of the artist and Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photo credit: Jeff McLane
arc568_hires.jpg

Edgar Arceneaux, whose body of work includes sculpture, video, and performance, presents two framed drawings on sheets of muslin, entitled Migrant's Totem I & II, 2017. In these works, markings and erasures create ghostly images evoking time, process, and the movements of migration, all the while capturing the tenuous and segregated realities of the American Dream.

Sadie Benning
“Note,” 2017
Wood, aqua resin, casein, digital image, and found photograph
17 ³⁄₄" x 17 ³⁄₄" [HxW] (45.09 x 45.09 cm);
Inventory #BEN545
Courtesy of the artist and Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photocredit: Chris Austin
ben545_hires.jpg
Sadie Benning
“Hands,” 2017
Wood, aqua resin, digital image, and found photograph
38 ¹⁄₂" x 28 ¹⁄₂" [HxW] (97.79 x 72.39 cm)
Inventory #BEN528
Courtesy of the artist and Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photocredit: Chris Austin
ben528_hires.jpg

Over the last three decades, Sadie Benning has made work ranging from experimental video and performance to mixed-media wall-mounted works that trouble the distinctions between painting, drawing, sculpture, and photo collage. The material hybridity of Benning’s work speaks to a continued desire to foreground ambiguity as an important aspect of making artworks.

Ellen Berkenblit
“Green and Pink Plastic Moth,” 2020
Gouache and graphite on Legion Stonehenge paper
47" x 33 ¹⁄₄" x 2" [HxWxD] (119.38 x 84.45 x 5.08 cm), framed
Inventory #BER210
Courtesy of the artist and Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photo credit: Jeff McLane
ber210_hires.jpg
Ellen Berkenblit
“Pink Moth,” 2020
Gouache and graphite on Legion Stonehenge paper
47" x 33 ¹⁄₄" x 2" [HxWxD] (119.38 x 84.45 x 5.08 cm), framed
Inventory #BER209
Courtesy of the artist and Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photo credit: Jeff McLane
ber209_hires.jpg
Ellen Berkenblit
“The Red Balloon,” 2020
Gouache and graphite on Legion Stonehenge paper
47" x 33 ¹⁄₄" x 2" [HxWxD] (119.38 x 84.45 x 5.08 cm), framed
Inventory #BER208
Courtesy of the artist and Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photo credit: Jeff McLane
ber208_hires.jpg
Ellen Berkenblit
“Striped Moth,” 2020
Gouache and graphite on Legion Stonehenge paper
47" x 33 ¹⁄₄" x 2" [HxWxD] (119.38 x 84.45 x 5.08 cm), framed
Inventory #BER201
Courtesy of the artist and Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photo credit: Jeff McLane
ber201_hires.jpg

Ellen Berkenblit’s bold paintings are composed of an ever-evolving pictorial calligraphy featuring the profile of long-nosed and screaming women, stripey tigers, flowers, and other motifs. In Berkenblit’s hand, these figures undergo a certain alchemy; their logic is transformed from mundane representation to that of dreams and sensation through wild shifts in scale and color.

Andrea Bowers
“We Must Rise Above the Tides, Protest Sign Slogan at Youth Climate Strike L.A., November 1, 2019 (Original Illustration by Arthur Rackham from Undine by Friedrich de La Motte Fouqué, Translated to English by William Leonard Courtney, Published by William Heinemann Ltd., London, 1909),” 2020
Acrylic marker on cardboard
84" x 62 ¹⁄₂" x 5" [HxWxD] (213.36 x 158.75 x 12.7 cm)
Inventory #BOW551
Courtesy of the artist and Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photo credit: Jeff Mclane
bow551_hires-1624615652.jpg

Andrea Bowers is an artist and activist based in Los Angeles. Her cross-disciplinary practice includes drawing, video, sculpture, and installation work that foregrounds the experience of the people who dedicate their time and energy to the struggle for gender, racial, environmental, labor, and immigration justice and those who are directly affected by systemic inequality. Her large drawings on cardboard reinterpret historical political graphics, pairing these images created with current slogans to highlight the longitudinal nature of making change.

Kim Dingle
“Falling Girl,” 1992
Oil on Belgian Linen
72" x 60" [HxW] (182.88 x 152.4 cm)
Inventory #DIN307
Courtesy of Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photo credit: Brica Wilcox
din307_hires-1624615968.jpg
Kim Dingle
“The Priss Papers (Pink Babies),” 1995
Oil on wallpaper on mahogany panel
61 ¹⁄₂" x 49 ¹⁄₂" x 2 ¹⁄₂" [HxWxD] (156.21 x 125.73 x 6.35 cm)
Inventory #DIN329
Courtesy of Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photo credit: Brica Wilcox
din329_hires.jpg
Kim Dingle
“Corner Girls,” 1992
Oil on Belgian canvas
9 ³⁄₄" x 14 ¹⁄₂" x 7" [HxWxD] (24.77 x 36.83 x 17.78 cm)
Inventory #DIN335
Courtesy of Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photo credit: Jeff McLane
din335_hires.jpg
Kim Dingle
“Priss Installation,” 1994/1995
Mixed media, wallpaper, oil, paint, crib, newsprint, stuffed animals, debris, sculptures, porcelain, china paint, steel wool, fabric
94 ¹⁄₂" x 12' 6" x 2" [HxWxD] (240.03 x 381 x 5.08 cm)
Inventory #DIN309
Courtesy of Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photo credit: Evan Bedford
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We are especially thrilled to present Kim Dingle’s eponymous Priss Installation from 1994/1995, in which two baby sculptures standing in their crib joyfully wreak havoc on their toys and surroundings, shattering expected modes of female behavior along the way.

Sean Duffy
“Star Seed,” 2021
20 Sun records, microphone stand, wood, enamel and metal hardware
34" x 21" x 21" [HxWxD] (86.36 x 53.34 x 53.34 cm)
Inventory #DUF357
Courtesy of the artist and Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photo credit: Evan Bedford
duf357_lores.jpg

Sean Duffy presents a new sculpture fashioned from records of the Sun Records label. Star Seed is composed of 20 albums pinned in place at the moment they begin to move apart. It imagines Sun Records and its stars as a supernova—or seed pod—just before exploding and disseminating its energy through space.

Nicole Eisenman
“FTP,” 2020
Oil on canvas
30" x 24" [HxW] (76.2 x 60.96 cm)
Inventory #EIS601
Courtesy of the artist and Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photo credit: Jeff McLane
Signed and dated on the back
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Nicole Eisenman
“Empty City (with Man in Need),” 2020
Oil on linen
30" x 24" x 1" [HxWxD] (76.2 x 60.96 x 2.54 cm)
Inventory #EIS600
Courtesy of the artist and Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photo credit: Jeff McLane
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Nicole Eisenman is known for irreverent and humorous figurative paintings, prints, and sculptures. Their diverse practice, which early on also included installations and video, is rife with art historical references and allusions and often humorously undermines male-centric, misogynist, and homophobic narratives. On view here are two new paintings made for the exhibition capturing two heartbreaking images of the pandemic.

Louise Fishman
“JASPER,” 2016
Oil on linen
30" x 30" [HxW] (76.2 x 76.2 cm)
Inventory #FIS158
Courtesy of the artist and Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photo credit: Jeff McLane
fis158_hires-1624616555.jpg

The work of Louise Fishman offers an unwavering exploration of scale, materiality, gesture, and light within the field of abstraction. Her painting Jasper, 2016 is a lustrous and electric composition, exemplary of the artist’s bold and physical tenor honed over the last five decades.

Charles Gaines is a key figure in conceptual art. Over the last 40 years, his artwork and writing have radically questioned the relationships between aesthetic experience, political belief, and the formation of meaning. Gaines’ employs systems and rule-based procedures to produce his work and to explore how we experience and derive meaning from art and how this process is deeply embedded in and influenced by our cultural upbringing.

Karl Haendel
“I have spoken when I could have been quiet #2,” 2021
Pencil on paper
framed: 54" x 45" [HxW] (137.16 x 114.3 cm)
Inventory #HAE590
Courtesy of the artist and Vielmetter Los Angeles
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Karl Haendel’s large, labor-intensive, photorealistic pencil drawings are often presented as interconnected groups that compose large installations. His work uses drawing to discover connections and affinities between seemingly disparate nodes of cultural data, drawing attention to the overlaps between the social, political, and personal.

Samuel Levi Jones
“Action Over Words,” 2021
Law book covers on canvas
60" x 50" [HxW] (152.4 x 127 cm)
Inventory #JON139
Courtesy of the artist and Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photo credit: Evan Bedford
jones_139_actionoverwords_full_hires.jpg

Sam Levi Jones deconstructs and manipulates books such as encyclopedias and textbooks, to critically explore systems of knowledge and power. Action Over Words, 2021 is composed of deconstructed law books, symbolically dismantling their implicit authority.

My Barbarian
“Harry,” 2014
26.50" H x 18" W x 6" D (67.31 cm H x 45.72 cm W x 15.24 cm D)
Inventory #MBB205
Courtesy of Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photo credit: Robert Wedemeyer
mbb205_hires.jpg
My Barbarian
“Hanna,” 2014
28" H x 10.50" W x 5.50" D (71.12 cm H x 26.67 cm W x 13.97 cm D)
Inventory #MBB206
Courtesy of Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photo credit: Robert Wedemeyer
mbb206_hires.jpg
My Barbarian
“Rainer,” 2014
24" H x 12" W x 6" D (60.96 cm H x 30.48 cm W x 15.24 cm D)
Inventory #MBB207
Courtesy of Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photo credit: Robert Wedemeyer
mbb207_hires.jpg
My Barbarian
“Brigitte (doll),” 2014
20.25" H x 10" W x 5" D (51.44 cm H x 25.4 cm W x 12.7 cm D)
Inventory #MBB202
Courtesy of Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photo credit: Robert Wedemeyer
mbb202_hires.jpg
My Barbarian
“Günther (doll),” 2014
29" H x 13" W x 7.50" D (73.66 cm H x 33.02 cm W x 19.05 cm D)
Inventory #MBB203
Courtesy of Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photo credit: Robert Wedemeyer
mbb203_hires.jpg

Founded in 2000 in Los Angeles, My Barbarian is the umbrella for works collaboratively created by Malik Gaines, Jade Gordon, and Alexandro Segade. Their collective work uses performance to explore social difficulties; often re-framing Marxist, feminist, and queer theory, pop culture, and classics through playful, campy intervention. On view here are 5 dolls from their 2014 adaptation of Blood on the Cat’s Neck, a play by Rainer Werner Fassbinder. The dolls are based on members of Fassbinder’s antiteater troupe.

Hugo McCloud
“June 17, 2021,” 2021
Plastic merchandise bags on wood panel
21" x 17" [HxW] (53.34 x 43.18 cm)
Inventory #MCC153
Courtesy of the artist and Vielmetter Los Angeles
mcc153_lores.jpg
Hugo McCloud
“June 21, 2021,” 2021
Plastic merchandise bags on wood panel
21" x 17" [HxW] (53.34 x 43.18 cm)
Inventory #MCC152
Courtesy of the artist and Vielmetter Los Angeles
mcc152_lores.jpg
Hugo McCloud
“May 5, 2021,” 2021
Plastic merchandise bags on wood panel
21" x 17" [HxW] (53.34 x 43.18 cm)
Inventory #MCC151
Courtesy of the artist and Vielmetter Los Angeles
mcc151_lores.jpg

Hugo McCloud connects the world of contemplation and desire where art resides to the practical world of labor where objects are painstakingly made and materials are carried over large distances, often under harsh conditions. On view in the exhibition are several new paintings made from molten commercial plastic bags that are transformed into images of beauty and grace.

Dave McKenzie
“Kinky to Wavy (002),” 2012
Nylon and wood
39" H x 36" W (99.06 cm H x 91.44 cm W)
Inventory #MCK137
Courtesy of Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photo credit: Robert Wedemeyer
mck137_hires.jpg

Dave McKenzie creates videos, performances, installations, and objects that examine the inner workings of contemporary culture and attempt to understand how it structures our desires and beliefs. McKenzie describes his work as an attempt to produce new situations that may become models for himself or for others. This is often achieved by creating work with familiar forms and images and using this familiarity to create a tension between the experience of the work and the expected experience of the familiar thing.

Rodney McMillian
“Elie Mystal, January 10, 2021,” 2021
Ink, acrylic, latex, paper, on paper mounted on canvas
51" x 83 ¹⁄₂" [HxW] (129.54 x 212.09 cm)
Inventory #MCR418
Courtesy of the artist and Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photo credit: Evan Bedford
mcmillian_418_notyettitled_full_hires.jpg

Rodney McMillian explores the complex and fraught connections between history and contemporary culture, not only as they are expressed in American politics, but also as they are manifest in American modernist art traditions. The work shown here is from a series of works on paper combining mixed media and text to narrate a history of the violence against Black bodies in the name of "science" and of the profit gained from slavery through the present. McMillian holds up the blood-stained land and the often-obscured histories of structural racial violence as a record of one of the many histories of this nation.

Yunhee Min
“Untitled (up and down with red),” 2020
Enamel, acrylic on starphire tempered glass with aluminum frame
45 ¹⁄₄" x 34 ¹⁄₄" x 1 ¹⁄₂" [HxWxD] (114.94 x 87 x 3.81 cm)
Inventory #MIN360
Courtesy of the artist and Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photo credit: Evan Bedford
min360_lores-2.jpg

Yunhee Min’s series of paintings on glass are intimate studies in the reaction of two materials–transparent glass paired with poured paint. The use of enamel–traditionally used for commercial sign painting–on laminated glass results in intuitively composed paintings that exude a tangible sense of the viscosity of the paint and emphasize the bright saturation of the colors on a reflective surface.

Mary Reid Kelley, Patrick Kelley
“Torpedo Juice,” 2017
Photograph, transparency on lightbox
73 ¹⁄₄" x 37 ¹⁄₄" x 1 ¹⁄₂" [HxWxD] (186.06 x 94.62 x 3.81 cm)
Edition 3 of 4, 2 AP
Inventory #MRK156.03
Courtesy of the artist and Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photo credit: Robert Wedemeyer
reidkelley_156_torpedojuice_hires-1624617406.jpg

Mary Reid Kelley is well known for her fast-paced, bitingly humorous video works (often made in collaboration with Patrick Kelley) that reinterpret myth and history through a female-centric lens. In this work, we see her enacting a soldier aboard a submarine in a scene culled from her ambitious recent video In The Body of The Sturgeon.

Elizabeth Neel
“Facing the Further,” 2020
Acrylic on canvas
78" x 12' 6" [HxW] (198.12 x 381 cm)
Inventory #NEE252
Courtesy of the artist and Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photocredit Adam Reich, NY
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Elizabeth Neel’s large-scale painting on canvas expounds on the language of abstraction in which physical and psychological experiences are externalized through varying methods of application. Using a diverse vocabulary of mark-making tools, including fingers, rags, brushes, mono-printing techniques and rollers, Neel reflects upon the correlative and repetitious cycles of life in her work.

Ruben Ochoa
“The Monsters on Maple St.,” 2013
Acrylic on raw linen
48" H x 36" W (121.92 cm H x 91.44 cm W)
Inventory #OCH277
Courtesy of the artist and Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photo credit: Robert Wedemeyer
och277_hires.jpg

Ruben Ochoa’s painting from 2013 simultaneously references Malevich’s Black Square, Luciano Fontana’s Slashed Canvases, and Michael Heizer’s Double Negative. Rendered on a small area of large, untreated linen, the painting, like Ochoa’s sculptures, emphasizes “inappropriate” or unexpected approaches to foundation materials.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya
“Figure (0X5A0918),” 2019
Archival pigment print
75 x 50" [HxW] (190.5 x 127 cm) print size; 76 x 51 x 2" [HxWxD] (193.04 x 129.54 x 5.08 cm) framed
Edition 4 of 5, 2 AP
Inventory #SEP652.04
Courtesy of the artist and Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photo credit: Jeff McLane
sep652.04_lores-3.jpg

Paul Mpagi Sepuya is a studio photographer, making pictures and portraits of himself, friends, artists, and others that challenge the history of portrait photography, dominant modes of interpreting photographic images, and conventional ideas of artistic authorship. The ambiguity of what you are looking at–the sitters, their reflections, the studio, the black velvet backdrop that renders the surface of the mirror enticingly smudged with remnants of tape and fingerprints–is visually and intellectually exciting, a puzzle of surface, screen, and reflection.

Nicola Tyson
“Flowerpot,” 2013
Acrylic on unstretched linen
85" H x 54.50" W (215.9 cm H x 138.43 cm W)
Inventory #TYS114
Courtesy of the artist and Vielmetter Los Angeles
Photo credit: Robert Wedemeyer
On reverse
tys114_lores.jpg

In her paintings and drawings, Nicola Tyson has developed a style that she terms "psycho-figuration” an approach to rendering bodies in dry, thin applications of boldly hued acrylic paint or intensely applied, gestural pencil marks. These morphological figures appear to be in a state of constant transition; indeterminacy forms compelling vitality. Her depictions of humans, plants, and animals have a certain tender humor, revealing the vulnerability and strangeness of the physical body.